Company formation Registration - HOME

Directors and secretaries
Change of registered office
Company records
Resolutions
Change of company name
Change of constitution
Share capital
Re-registration of a company
Charges & mortgages (England and Wales, Northern Ireland)
Charges and mortgages (Scotland)
Quality of documents
Further information


Introduction


This guide explains:

Chapter 1 - Directors and Secretaries - the roles and responsibilities of a company director and secretary and how to notify Companies House of an appointment, termination of an appointment or change of details of a company officer.
Chapter 2 Change of Registered Office – how to change your registered office address.
Chapter 3 Company Records - the types of records a company must keep and your duty to notify Companies House of their location.
Chapter 4 Resolutions - the types of company resolution and examples of when companies pass them.
Chapter 5 Change of Company Name – the ways in which a company can change its name.
Chapter 6 Change of Constitution – the ways in which a company can change its constitution.
Chapter 7 Share Capital - the basic features of the regime and the regulation of share capital, allotment and cancellation of shares, types of shares and restructuring share capital and examples of when you must notify Companies House of an event.
Chapter 8 Re-registration of a company – the types of re-registration as a means of changing a company’s status.
Chapters 9 & 10 Charge & Mortgage Registration – the requirements for the registration and the notification of the satisfaction of mortgages or charges in England and Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland.
Chapter 11 Quality of Documents.
Chapter 12 Further Information.
This guide will not cover every event that will come along during the life of a company. However, it will give you a good idea of your responsibilities as they relate to the specific areas covered and explain the filing requirements at Companies House. If, after reading this guide, you are in doubt about your responsibilities, you should consider seeking professional advice from a solicitor or accountant.