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Disclosure of the LLP name and other information
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Disclosure of LLP name and other specified information


1. What does disclosure mean?

An LLP is required to display its name at its registered office, other places of business and on all business communications. It must also include its registration details in its letters (including those sent electronically), order forms and websites. These requirements are contained in The Limited Liability Partnerships (Application of Companies Act 2006) Regulations 2009 and The Companies (Trading Disclosures) Regulations SI 2008/495, as applied to LLPs and as amended by The Companies (Trading Disclosures) (Amendment) Regulations 2009 SI 2009/218.

2. Where must I display my LLP’s name?

Every LLP, unless it has at all times been dormant since incorporation, must display a sign with its registered name at:

its registered office;
any inspection place; and
at any location at which it carries on business (unless it is primarily used for living accommodation)or if the LLPs activities are likely to attract violent objections.
It must also include its registered name in all business communications (hard copy and electronic).

3. How must I display the sign with my LLP name?

You must display a sign with your LLP name:

in characters that can be read with the naked eye;
in such a way that visitors to that office, place or location may easily see it at any time; and
continuously, but if the location is shared by 6 or more LLPs, each such LLP is only required to display its registered name for at least 15 continuous seconds at least once in every 3 minutes.


4. How must I display the LLP name in communications?

You must include your LLP’s registered name in all forms of business communications and documents whether in hard copy or electronic including:

business letters, notices and other official publications;
business emails;
bills of exchange, promissory notes, endorsements and order forms;
cheques purporting to be signed by or on behalf of the LLP;
orders for money, goods or services purporting to be signed by or on behalf of the LLP;
bills of parcels, invoices and other demands for payment, receipts and letters of credit; and
all other forms of business correspondence and documentation.


5. Must I display my LLP name on my website?

Yes. Every LLP must disclose its registered name on its websites and on any part of a website relating to it which it has authorised. You do not need to include the LLP name on every page but it must be displayed so it can be easily read.

6. What additional information must I disclose?

On all your business letters, order forms and websites you must display:

the part of the UK in which the LLP is registered (i.e. England and Wales, or Wales, or Scotland, or Northern Ireland);
the LLP’s registered number; and
the address of the LLP’s registered office; and
where the LLP name ends with the abbreviation LLP, llp, or the Welsh equivalent, the fact that it is a limited liability partnership or the Welsh equivalents.


7. What information must the LLP provide?

If anyone with whom the LLP deals in the course of business makes a written request for:

the address of its registered office:
the address of any place of inspection; and
the type of LLP records kept at the registered office or inspection place.
The LLP must provide the information in writing within five working days of the receipt of that request.

8. Do I have to display members' names?

If the LLP includes the name of any member on its business letters, other than in the body of the letter or as a signatory to it, it must include all the members’ names. It cannot be selective about which names to include.

However if the LLP has more than 20 members providing it keeps a list of all the members’ names at its principal place of business and the document states that the list is available for inspection it need not show the members’ names.

9. What if the LLP is being wound up?

If the LLP is being wound up, is in administration, receivership or a moratorium is in force in respect of its debts then every invoice, order for goods, business letter or order form (in hard copy, electronic or any other form) must contain a statement that the LLP is being wound up.

10. What disclosures does an Overseas LLP have to make?

An Overseas LLP must display the LLP’s name and the country in which it is incorporated or otherwise established at every location where it carries on business in the United Kingdom.

The Overseas LLP must display its LLP name and country of incorporation:

in characters that can be read with the naked eye;
in such a way that visitors to that office, place or location may easily see it;
so that it can be seen at any time, i.e. not only during business hours; and
continuously, but if the location is shared by 6 or more LLPs, each such name and country of incorporation are displayed for at least 15 continuous seconds at least once every 3 minutes.
The Overseas LLP must also state the LLP’s name and country of incorporation in all forms of business communications and documents whether in hard copy or electronic, including:

business letters, notices and other official publications;
business emails;
bills of exchange of promissory notes, endorsements and order forms;
cheques purporting to be signed by or on behalf of the Overseas LLP;
orders for money, goods or services purporting to be signed by or on behalf of the Overseas LLP;
bills or parcels, invoices and other demands for payment, receipts and letters of credit;
applications for licenses to carry on trade or activity,
other forms of business correspondence and documentation; and its websites.


11. What is meant by an Overseas LLP?

An Overseas LLP is a body incorporated or otherwise established outside the United Kingdom whose name under its law of incorporation, or establishment, includes (or when translated into English includes) the words “limited liability partnership” or the abbreviation ’LLP’ or ’llp’.