Company formation Registration - HOME

Incorporating an LLP
Members and designated members
Choosing an LLP name
Sensitive words and expressions
Change of LLP name
Objections to an existing LLP name
Disclosure of the LLP name and other information
Quality of documents
Further information


Introduction


This guide will tell you what documents you need to send to Companies House when you want to incorporate an LLP in the UK. It covers the formation documents, member’s responsibilities, and the controls applied to the use of certain names. This includes:

the rules and restrictions on the choice of LLP name both when the LLP is formed and when it changes its name;
how to change an existing LLP’s name;
when Companies House will not register an LLP name and when the use of sensitive words or expressions will need to be justified or need prior approval from a recognised authority; and
when you can object to the registration of a particular LLP name, and also what to do if your LLP name has been objected to and you are directed by the Secretary of State to change the name.
All LLPs must disclose certain information to Companies House for the public record and to the people they deal with. For instance the law sets out where you must display the LLP name and what information must appear on its stationery.

This guide is intended as an introduction to the obligations of having an LLP. There are further guides available on Life of a Limited Liability Partnership; Limited Liability Partnerships Strike Off, Dissolution and Restoration and Limited Liability Partnerships Late Filing Penalties.

You will find the relevant legislation for LLP incorporation and names in The Limited Liability Partnerships Act 2000, and in The Limited Liability Partnerships (Application of the Companies Act 2006) Regulations 2009 SI 2009/1804 which apply parts of the Companies Act 2006 and various sets of regulations to LLPs.

Companies House cannot advise you whether an LLP is the best vehicle for your business. Setting up an LLP brings many obligations. It may be worthwhile taking advice from a solicitor or accountant to check whether an LLP is the best way for you to run your business. See also the Business Link website.